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Hunters concerned about Congressman King's bill to return some land to the Winnebago Tribe

Hunters concerned about Congressman King's bill to return some land to the Winnebago Tribe

For as long as he's been alive, Lance Larson, has always loved hunting and fishing.

"It's breath-taking down here, I mean this area has looked like this since Lewis and Clark came through here. The cottonwood trees, the grasses, the sand dunes, it's beautiful down here," said Lance Larson, a hunter and fisher.

And he's got a group who loves the outdoors just as much. But these men are concerned about Iowa Congressman Steve King's bill to return some land to the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. That land in question, just north and south of the WinnaVegas Casino. King introduced a new bill, one that Republican Congressman Jeff Fortenberry of Nebraska has signed on to.

"And if it's going to sit there for the next hundred years, not being utilized as it has sat there for the last 41 years, then it's time for the Winnebago Tribe to manage and control their own land," said King.

On the contrary, Larson and dozens of hunters, are asking King to pull the bill.

"We then got a hold of the Woodbury County Conservation Board, Woodbury County Pheasants Ducks Unlimited, and Delta Water Flower and have all those guys on our side, pushing to keep this public hunting," said Larson.

Larson, who started a petition online, said he refutes the claims that the Winnebago Tribe has ever owned that property.

"There's a lot of people that use this area down here and right now the tribal members themselves can come down here. Anybody can come down here for free and step foot on this property. Once you privatize this ground, then you're open to any kind of financial boundaries, as far as what it's going to cost when you're walking there or hunting down there. They can charge whatever they want," said Larson.

The bill is about the return of numerous acres along the Missouri River that were condemned by the Army Corp of Engineers in 1976.

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